Love and Olive Oil - Eat to Live. Cook to Love.

Pizza with Eggs, Roasted Red Peppers, Olives and Arugula

Pizza with Eggs, Roasted Red Peppers, Olives and Arugula

I miss pizza. Poor Taylor (who can still eat pizza) misses pizza more than I do. So when I come across a pizza recipe that isn’t slathered in mozzarella, I jump on it. Like this recipe, found in the January issue of Bon Appetit. Only cheese on this baby is Parmesan, which is aged enough that it doesn’t harm my delicate stomach. Perfect.

Granted, it looks a bit out there. Eggs? On a pizza? Odd. But surprisingly good. And creative too – I mean, whoever though of strategically placing thick rings of red onion on the pizza to contain the eggs? Genius. Just be sure you have something underneath your pizza (like a rimmed baking sheet) to catch any egg that decides to escape.

The crust was a bit tough. Not sure if that was my fault or the recipe’s, but I have a pizza crust recipe that I think is much better. Next time we make this, and there WILL BE a next time, we’ll use that crust recipe instead.

Pizza with Eggs, Roasted Red Peppers, Olives and Arugula

Makes 2-4 servings. Recipe from Bon Appetit.

Ingredients:

Dough:
2 tablespoons warm water (115°F)
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
1 1/3 cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup cool water (65°F to 70°F)
1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
Olive oil
Cornmeal (for sprinkling)

Topping:
Olive oil
3/4 cup drained roasted red peppers from jar, cut into 1/3-inch strips
1/3 cup Kalamata olives, pitted, quartered
1 cup Parmesan cheese shavings
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
4 large red onion rings (each 3 1/2 to 4 inches in diameter and 1/2 inch thick)
4 large eggs
2 cups (lightly packed) arugula

Directions:

For dough: Pour 2 tablespoons warm water into large bowl of stand mixer fitted with dough hook; sprinkle yeast over. Let stand until yeast dissolves, about 15 minutes (mixture will not be foamy). Add both flours, 1/2 cup cool water, and 1 teaspoon coarse salt; mix on medium-low speed 4 minutes. Let rest 5 minutes, then mix on medium speed until dough is smooth, elastic, and slightly sticky, about 3 minutes.

Lightly oil medium bowl. Gather dough into ball and transfer to prepared bowl; turn to coat with oil. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature 30 minutes. Chill dough overnight. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 days ahead. Keep chilled.

Transfer bowl to warm draft-free area and let dough rise, covered, until very slightly puffy, at least 2 hours.

For topping: Place pizza stone or rimless baking sheet in oven; preheat to 500°F. Sprinkle pizza paddle or another baking sheet generously with cornmeal. Roll out dough on lightly floured surface to 12-inch round; transfer to paddle. Brush dough with oil; scatter peppers, then olives over. Sprinkle with Parmesan and rosemary. Arrange onion rings atop pizza, spacing apart. Slide pizza onto stone or baking sheet in oven; bake until lightly browned but not crisp, about 7 minutes. Remove pizza from oven and gently crack 1 egg into each onion ring. Return pizza to oven and continue to bake until eggs are softly set and crust is golden, about 6 minutes. Sprinkle pizza with salt and pepper. Scatter arugula over.

Share this Post:

You may also like...

14 CommentsLeave a Comment →

  1. 1
    Posted On December 13, 2008 at 3:31 pm

    I’ve just come across your blog and the recipes are fantastic. I’ll certainly be taking inspiration from you and trying them out.

    We cheat a bit and make our pizza dough in the bread maker rather than by hand but I’ll certainly give this topping a try.

    I’ve added you to my blogroll to make sure I don’t miss out on new posts!

    Reply

  2. 2
    Posted On December 13, 2008 at 8:51 pm

    What a great looking pizza. Your picture is mouth-watering!

    Reply

  3. 3
    axelle
    Posted On December 14, 2008 at 4:50 am

    This pizza does look good! But here in France it is not that unusual to have eggs on a pizza. It is in fact quite common, i would say.
    Living in frnace, then i have a question regarding arugula: what is it? and does come by another name (one that i may know)?

    Reply

  4. 4
    Posted On December 14, 2008 at 6:09 am

    Having spent some time living in Quebec, I can answer the above commenter–I think arugula translates to roquette. Incidentally, I love the idea of arugula’s peppery flavour with egg. And on top of a pizza? Lovely! Thanks for the recipe tip.

    Reply

  5. 5
    Posted On December 14, 2008 at 7:52 am

    The name in Europe most commonly used is “Rocket.” It’s funny you should ask, because as an American who has been transplanted into Switzerland, that was one of my first food questions, “What the heck is rocket??” Enjoy!

    Reply

  6. 6
    Posted On December 14, 2008 at 9:55 am

    Not odd at all!
    It looks absolutely amazing.

    Can’t go wrong with eggs and olives.

    Reply

  7. 7
    axelle
    Posted On December 14, 2008 at 10:14 am

    to Hanne and Pamela: thank you! Now that i take a closer look at the picture it does look like rocket, but i could never have imagined that it would translate that way in the U.S. i used to live in scotland and new zealand where it was called rocket as well. Anyone knows the origin of this particular name?

    Reply

  8. 8
    Posted On December 14, 2008 at 1:43 pm

    When I first went to France, they served me eggs on my pizza. I was in 5th grade and a tad skeptical, but I remember enjoying it. My favorite pizza shop in SF always has a pizza with egg on it. I love it. And this one looks soo good. I can’t wait to try it at home.

    Reply

  9. 9
    Posted On December 14, 2008 at 9:26 pm

    Saw this recipe in bon appetit and wondered if anyone would have the guts to try it… very gutsy to depend on those onion rings to contain that slimy raw egg! The end result looks delicious, and now that I know that at least one real person (not gourmet magazine pro) didn’t have a eggy disaster, I’ll try it!

    Reply

  10. 10
    Posted On December 15, 2008 at 8:28 am

    Hi Lou Ann -

    One of the eggs did ‘seep’ a bit. We put the pizza on a rimmed baking sheet just to be sure. Or at least put another sheet underneath it just in case things do get messy. Good luck! :)

    Reply

  11. 11
    Posted On December 19, 2008 at 10:29 pm

    What a gorgeous photograpgh! I’m hungry but grateful for the recipe so I can reproduce what you’ve done.

    Reply

  12. 12
    Posted On August 3, 2009 at 1:37 pm

    I’ve come across your website and found this exciting recipe. It looks great and I bet it taste even better. Thank you for sharing the recipe.

    Reply

  13. 13
    Posted On February 9, 2011 at 12:39 pm

    I absolutely love your blog! I have posted (with credit & links, of course) almost all of your recipes on my tumblr. The photographs are just beautiful! :)

    Reply

  14. 14
    Pache
    Posted On May 31, 2013 at 7:59 pm

    If you go to Australia, one of the standard varieties of pizza is the “Aussie”: Bacon & Egg on a standard Mozzarella + Tomato base. Most normal suburban pizza places will have it on the menu.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Current day month ye@r *