Love and Olive Oil

Homemade Peach Mustard

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Homemade Peach Mustard from www.loveandoliveoil.com

Have you ever made homemade mustard? Have you ever even thought about making homemade mustard?

Well not only did I think about it, I did it, and now you’re probably thinking about it too. You’re welcome.

Because seriously? It’s so easy you’ll be shocked.

Homemade Peach Mustard from www.loveandoliveoil.com

The idea for the fruit mustard came from a dinner in New Orleans, where Taylor ordered a charcuterie plate that came with an adorable little tube of strawberry mustard. Since we wanted to make a homemade mustard anyway (the reason will reveal itself later this week), and peaches just so happened to be in their prime, we thought they’d make a wonderful addition to the spicy homemade mustard. Sure, you can leave out the peach and have a nice basic mustard to adorn your ‘whiches and dogs, but the peach makes this mustard unique, adding just a hint of fruitiness and sweetness to the final product. Unlike my peach jams where the goal was to make it primarily peach, this is most definitely a mustard first and foremost. The burning you’ll feel under your eyelids if you eat some plain will leave no doubt of that.

Think of the peach as just a little something extra. :)

Homemade Peach Mustard from www.loveandoliveoil.com

Don’t be fooled by the peach, however. This is a SPICY mustard. Seriously spicy. To tone it down you’re going to need a nice soft slab of white bread. And some cool and crunchy pickles. And some salty cured meat.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Mustard now. Accoutrements coming later.

Homemade Peach Mustard

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup yellow mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons brown mustard seeds
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1 large peach, peeled and pitted
  • 1 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:

  1. Cover yellow and brown mustard seeds with vinegar in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate overnight to soften.
  2. The next day, pour mustard seeds and vinegar into a blender or food processor. Pulse until smooth. Add peach, sugar, garlic powder, turmeric, paprika, and salt and blend until evenly incorporated. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.
  3. Mustard will keep, refrigerated in a jar or airtight container, for up to 1 month.
All images and text © Lindsay Landis /

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26 Comments Leave a Comment »

  1. Wow, I hadn’t realised mustard could be ‘made’ at home. I love mustard but finding a perfect one is not always easy as they seem to be too mild or blow-your-head-off hot. The idea of a flavoured mustard is hugely attractive too. Thanks for this.

  2. Not sure if it’s my device, but the background of forks makes it very difficult to read the recipe. 

  3. Peach season is over where I live.  How would this be with mango?

  4. Oh, this sounds amazing! Spicier the better!

  5. I’ve made lots of mustard, but adding the peaches sounds amazing.

    Do you think this could be successfully canned?  I’m thinking ahead to holiday gifts.

  6. Una mostaza casera estupenda.
    Un saludito

  7. Peach mustard!? I have never heard of such a thing! I love this though – I looove spicy grainy mustard on sandwiches, wraps, with pretzels, smeared over chicken, you name it. I will have to try this out! Thank you!
    xo Rachel

  8. Your right, definitely never thought of making my own mustard before. But this looks amazing. I’ve all ready got some ideas now brewing for some good holiday gifts! Mustard in everyones stockings this year!

  9. I have indeed made homemade mustard, but never with fruit! Such a  great idea. I’m really curious as to how this tastes!

  10. Fruit Mustard? That’s a new one for me—–and a great new idea. It sounds perfect for something a little different. Thank you.

  11. What?! This is so much up my alley that I’m lost. Does that even make sense? Probably not. What I’m saying is that I love the creativity, mustard is one of my favorite condiments, and peaches are one of my favorite fruits. Triple whollop (in a good way).

  12. I’ve never heard of peach mustard ’til now and you have me hooked! Can’t wait to try it!

  13. Click on this if you REALLY want to spice things up -http://www.theonion.com/articles/man-on-internet-almost-falls-into-world-of-diy-mus,17013/

  14. Now that you mention it, I can’t believe I never thought of fruit mustard! What a natural combination. LOVE the looks of this. 

  15. I can’t wait to try this! I’m currently obsessed with charcuterie plates and will definitely be adding this to our next one. Thanks! 

  16. I never thought about making mustard, but the addition of fruit is making me want to try it! I could see this being good on so many things. Yum!

  17. Love the sound of homemade mustard and the addition of peaches!

  18. I’m interested in finding out if this receipe would be safe for Water-bath Canning in 4oz or half pint jars.

    • This recipe has not been tested as safe for canning, so I would not recommend it. I’ve never canned mustards before – you may need a pressure canner to do it safely. Refer to the USDA guidelines or a recipe from the Ball canning book to know for sure.

  19. Persimmons are in season now where I live. Could I make the mustard using these super-sweet fruits?

  20. I realize that as a blogger you have to be cautious with recommendations, but the acidity level of this mustard is safe for canning – I can a lot and the ph level of this recipe is way below 4.6, the cut off point for water bath canning. Wheni measured it, with the peaches added, it was 3.8 for my recipe using apple coffee vinegar.
     In fact, it is so low that the mustard should keep for close to indefinitely in a clean glass and a refrigerated environment. The taste will deteriorate over time, so consume within six month. 

    • Sorry, I typed the above on the phone in a hurry. It’s of course Apple cider vinegar, not coffee vinegar, although that does sound delicious now I think of it. 

    • I am not a food scientist nor has this recipe been lab tested for safe canning, so I cannot say definitively whether it is indeed safe. There are more factors than acid.

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