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Orecchiette with Italian Sausage, Broccoli Rabe and Crunchy Garlic Breadcrumbs

Orecchiette with Italian Sausage, Broccoli Rabe and Crunchy Garlic Breadcrumbs

I’ve eaten broccoli rabe twice. The first time, I hated it. We spent something ridiculous like $6 for a bunch of broccoli rabe (obviously out of season) in the grocery store. Can’t remember exactly what we did with it, but I do remember how bitter the final product was. Expensive and unenjoyable, bordering on inedible. I was robbed by the rabe.

But this time, I loved it. Broccoli rabe (pronounced rahb, sometimes spelled raab, and not technically related to broccoli at all), when cooked properly, is an unusual and healthy addition to any meal. This bunch from our CSA was especially young and tender, and we ate it all, from stems to the florets and even the delicate yellow blossoms.

Orecchiette with Italian Sausage, Broccoli Rabe and Crunchy Garlic Breadcrumbs

This recipe has you blanche the rabe first to remove much of the bitterness, and then pairs it beautifully with a sweet Italian sausage to balance out what bitter flavor is left. The crunchy, garlicky topping gives the dish a unique rustic texture and an unprecedented flavor, and may be the best part of the whole meal. This dish is a masterpiece of textures and flavors. Crunchy, meaty, and soft. Hearty with a hint of bitterness, yet subtly sweet and sweetly spicy at the same time. A success, through and through.

Orecchiette with Italian Sausage, Broccoli Rabe and Crunchy Garlic Breadcrumbs

Makes 4-6 servings.

Ingredients:

3-4 slices stale country bread, roughly chopped
salt and pepper, to taste
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
3 tablespoons olive oil

1 pound broccoli rabe, trimmed and cut into pieces
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, or more as needed
1 tablespoon chopped garlic, or more to taste
1/2 lb sweet Italian sausage, removed from casings
Pinch red pepper flakes
1 pound orecchiette pasta
Salt & freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions:

In a food processor, combine bread with salt, pepper, and dried herbs. Pulse briefly until bread breaks down into roughly 1/4-inch chunks.

Heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet. Add breadcrumbs and toss until well coated. Saute until golden brown and crispy, being careful not to let the smaller pieces burn. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a rolling boil. Add broccoli rabe, and boil for 5-10 minutes or until tender (this will depend on the variety and size of your pieces).

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat. When hot, add the garlic and cook until it begins to sizzle, about a minute; add the sausage and red pepper flakes and continue cooking until nicely browned, 5 to 7 minutes.

Scoop the broccoli out of the water with a slotted spoon or small strainer and transfer it to the skillet. Cook over medium-high heat, adding some of the pasta water as needed to help soften the broccoli.

In the already-boiling water, cook the pasta according to package directions. When the pasta is just barely al dente, drain, reserving about a cup of the cooking water. Add the pasta to the skillet with the broccoli and sausage and a couple of tablespoons of the reserved cooking water as needed; toss with until well combined. Season with salt and pepper. Top with breadcrumbs and parmesan cheese, as desired.

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9 CommentsLeave a Comment →

  1. 1
    Posted On June 9, 2010 at 10:29 pm

    For a long time this dish (minus the breadcrumbs) was the only way my mother could get us to eat broccoli rabe and it remains one of my favorite dinners to this day. Beautiful dish! I’m so glad you have entered the wonderful world of broccoli rabe eaters!

    Reply

  2. 2
    Posted On June 9, 2010 at 11:05 pm

    I’ve made a similar dish before and agree the combination of broccoli rabe and sausage is quite good, but for me it was the orecchiette that stole the show. I love the little ear-shaped pastas and how they have a bit of a chew to them. Looks beautiful!

    Reply

  3. 3
    Posted On June 10, 2010 at 12:56 am

    Orecchiette is my FAVORITE type of pasta :) Can’t go wrong!

    Reply

  4. 4
    Posted On June 10, 2010 at 3:47 am

    I love this recipe, it’s one of my favorite ways to enjoy pasta… and to be honest I don’t make it often enough! Thanks for reminding me about it!

    Reply

  5. 5
    Posted On June 10, 2010 at 2:59 pm

    First of all, I love this type of pasta. Always makes everything better. And I just took some sausage out of the freezer – looks like I found something to make with it! xxSAS

    Reply

  6. 6
    Posted On June 10, 2010 at 9:14 pm

    YUM. I love any kind of sausage pasta. The garlic breadcrumbs in this sound great.

    Reply

  7. 7
    Posted On June 10, 2010 at 10:05 pm

    Ah! Dare I try this? You make it sound pleasing… but my past experiences make it SO HARD to believe!

    My first experience with broccoli rabe came recently. I always like to try new things. Especially vegetables. I saw it at the market and thought – “this looks a lot like broccoli, smells like broccoli, so it MUST taste like broccoli, I’ll try it!”
    WRONG. First mistake: I put it in a salad. Raw.
    NEVER AGAIN.
    While your first experience “bordered on inedible,” mine went even further. Not only did I spit it out and rinse my mouth immediately after chewing, but the rabe was so awfully bitter to the point that I believed that I had been poisoned – no joke. I spent the next hour researching “dangers of raw broccoli rabe.” To my relief, broccoli rabe is “safe” to eat raw… though I really have no idea why anyone would willingly do so.

    I trust your judgement though, and I WILL try this. I will. Soon.

    Reply

  8. 8
    Posted On June 11, 2010 at 2:29 pm

    This looks scrumptious! I’m totally going to make this and then review it on my blog!

    Reply

  9. 9
    Posted On June 12, 2010 at 5:47 am

    What I love about orechiette (along with many other italian pasta names) is that it means “little ears.” Why wouldn’t I want to eat little ears? (And little hairs, little worms…)

    It looks quite lovely. I love the shaved cheese.

    Reply

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