Mongolian Beef

Mongolian Beef

This recipe is supposedly a “copy-cat” recipe of PF Chang’s Mongolian Beef. Neither of us can remember what exactly that tastes like, so I can’t say if it actually is or not, but it was pretty darn delicious. By no means healthy, but delicious nonetheless.

We used about half the oil the recipe calls for to cook the beef, but it was still a bit oily, though I guess that is to be expected with Chinese take out food. Mmm grease. The sauce itself is practically candy, and I’m sure the dish would be just as delicious if the beef were quickly pan-seared instead of submerged in cooking oil (sounds appetizing, doesn’t it?).

We added some yellow onion, which Taylor insists is always in a good plate of Mongolian beef. And he would know. It’s his go-to meal whenever we go out to dinner at a Chinese restaurant. You think he’d be more adventurous, but nope. Mongolian beef it is.

All we were missing were those crispy rice noodles that I love so much (and that are a blast to fry up yourself). Next time, since, you know, we still have two fajita packs left in the freezer.

Mongolian Beef

Makes 2 servings. Recipe adapted from here.

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon ginger, minced
1 tablespoon garlic, chopped
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup water
3/4 cup dark brown sugar
vegetable oil, for frying (about 1 cup)
1 lb flank steak
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
2 large green onions

Directions:

Make the sauce by heating 2 teaspoons of vegetable oil in a medium saucepan over med/low heat. Add ginger and garlic to the pan and quickly add the soy sauce and water before the garlic scorches. Dissolve the brown sugar in the sauce, then raise the heat to about medium and boil the sauce for 2-3 minutes or until the sauce thickens. Remove it from the heat.

Slice the flank steak against the grain into 1/4" thick bite-size slices. Tilt the blade of your knife at about a forty five degree angle to the top of the steak so that you get wider cuts. Dip the steak pieces into the cornstarch to apply a very thin dusting to both sides of each piece of beef. Let the beef sit for about 10 minutes so that the cornstarch sticks.

Heat up one cup of oil in a wok or large skillet until it's nice and hot, but not smoking. Add the beef to the oil and saute for two minutes, or until the beef just begins to darken on the edges. You don't need a thorough cooking here since the beef is going to go back on the heat later. Stir the meat around a little so that it cooks evenly. After a couple minutes, use a large slotted spoon to take the meat out and onto paper towels, then pour the oil out of the wok or skillet.

Put the pan back over the heat, dump the meat back into it. Add the onion and saute for one minute. Add the sauce, cook for one minute while stirring, then add all the green onions. Cook for one more minute, then remove the beef and onions with tongs or a slotted spoon to a serving plate, leaving the excess sauce behind in the pan.